Sep 22, 2019  
2018-2019 College Catalog 
    
2018-2019 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    AC 101 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I



    This first course in financial accounting and reporting taken by all business students assumes no prior knowledge of accounting. It introduces the FASB conceptual framework as the logic underlying accounting standards. It develops and traces the basic steps used in accounting and reporting for service-orientedentities and progresses to more complex merchandising firms with inventory valuation considerations. The course culminates in the use of simple financial statement analysis in reaching credit and investment decisions. A general ledger software package embedded in the coursework familiarizes students with the rapid electronic processing of information possible and with the basic outline of all such packages available today. Lecture: 4 hours per week. 4 Credits
  
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    AC 102 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II



    This course forms the second half of a two-course sequence in financial accounting and reporting. It concentrates on measurement and reporting of major balance sheet accounts, which include cash, receivables, investments, plant and equipment, intangibles, current liabilities, long-term debt, contributed capital, and retained earnings. The student learns preparation of the statement of cash flows using the direct method. Further financial statement analysis refocuses on the purposes behind the preparation of financial reports. Lecture: 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: AC 101 4 Credits Prerequisite: AC101
  
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    AC 120 ACCOUNTING USING PEACHTREE



    This course assumes a prior knowledge of accounting concepts and applications on the part of the student. It builds on the existing knowledge base of the student to give them a working knowledge of Peachtree software. This course will show the student the mechanics of setting up service and merchandising businesses using this well-known commercial software. Divided into three modules, the first module demonstrates how Peachtree is used. The second and third modules show how to set up and do accounting using Peachtree for service and merchandising businesses.Prerequisites: AC101 & AC102, or instructor permission 1 Credits Prerequisites: AC101 & AC102, or instructor permission
  
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    AC 201 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I



    This intermediate level course is the first part of a two-course sequence intended for accounting majors. This course in financial accounting and reporting broadens the existing theoretical and conceptual foundation and balances it with technical procedures. Students learn to identify, measure, and communicate financial information in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Coverage includes the FASBs conceptual framework of accounting, a review of the accounting process, the reporting requirements for income statement and the statement of retained earnings, classification and valuation in the balance sheet, the statement of cash flows, revenue recognition and income determination, and the concepts of time value of money. Lecture: 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: AC 102 4 Credits Prerequisite: AC102
  
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    AC 202 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II



    The second course in the sequence concentrates on the recognition, valuation, and reporting of the major balance sheet accounts and the related income statement accounts at the intermediate level. Topics include cash, current receivables and liabilities, inventory valuation, investments in debt and equity securities, plant assets and intangibles, long term debt, and stockholders? equity. Lecture: 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: AC 201 4 Credits Prerequisite: AC201
  
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    AC 206 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING



    This course focuses on the system of measuring and providing operational and financial information to management of business, non-profit, and governmentalorganizations. Students learn how managers use this information to make decisions, plan and control operations, gauge performance for reward systems, and foster a culture necessary to achieve an organization?s strategic objectives. The topics covered include cost concepts and behavior, variable and absorptioncosting, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgets, control and responsibility accounting, and product costing. Lecture: 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: AC 102 4 Credits Prerequisite: AC102
  
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    AC 207 INTRODUCTION TO TAXATION



    Based on the Model Tax Curriculum, this course introduces students to a broad range of tax concepts and types of taxpayers, particularly within a framework of financial accounting. The role of taxation in the business decision-making process is emphasized. The student is exposed to professionalstandards and ethics; and learns to do basic tax research and tax planning. This course gives an understanding of the interrelationship and differences between financial accounting and taxaccounting. Lecture: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AC 102 3 Credits Prerequisite: AC102
  
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    AC 210 ACCOUNTING WITH QUICKBOOKS



    This course introduces the QuickBooks software. Content includes software installation and creation of a new company; exploration of QuickBooks user interface, internal controls, help resources, and sample product and service companies; setting up of a merchandising company; working with inventory, vendors, and customers; completing year end adjusting entries, closing of fiscal year, and printing of financial statements. Prerequisite: AC101 2 Credits Prerequisite: AC101

Anthropology

  
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    AN 203 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY



    This course investigates how human societies are organizedand the basic concept of ?culture.? We develop an understandingof how anthropologists interpret social, economic, and beliefsystems in different societies. The course also considers howanthropologists conduct research, and what role Anthropologyshould play in an increasingly global society. Societies studied includethose of southern Africa, the South American Amazon, andPapua New Guinea. This is a sophomore level course that requiresseveral research papers. Lecture: 3 hours per week. 3 Credits

Art

  
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    AR 100 ART FUNDAMENTALS



    Art Fundamentals is a global introduction to the field of Art for non-art majors and art majors. Art Fundamentals is a course that explores through study of elements of art and the various art forms and a chronological study of art history. The course is a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the present. The course offers an introduction and evaluation of the visual artist, with emphasis on the relationship of the end product. The main purpose of this course is to gain appreciation for art. The specific topics in this course include; learning about terms and concepts common to all of the visual arts (for example, composition, space, content, color). The student will explore materials, media and presentation skills (traditional and technology media included). Students will learn to compose the vocabulary of visual elements and principals as well as construction processes and material commonly understood. Through proscribed projects students will progressively define and articulate their subjective interests, expressive ideas, and visual affinities. Students will participate in critiques. Students will purchase their own artistic materials. Students will leave the course with a portfolio of work. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 101 HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF ART I



    A study of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the prehistoric period through the 15th-century Italian Renaissance. Includes Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Christian Art; Giotto, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Raphael, and Leonardo da Vinci. Emphasis given to understanding changes in major styles, the role of the artist, and the relationship of Fine Arts to social-cultural trends. Lecture: 3 hours per week. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 102 HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF ART II



    History of Western Art from the Renaissance to the present. Includes Michelangelo, van Eyck, Durer, Velazquez, Rembrandt, Goya, Picasso, and Matisse. Emphasis is given to sequential development of major styles in painting, sculpture, and architecture, the role of the individual artist, and the relationship of visual arts to social cultural trends. Lecture: 3 hours per week. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 110 FORM STUDY



    This is an introductory composition course aimed at developing problem solving skills in the three and four-dimensional realms. The student will develop a more precise visual vocabulary. Elements and principles of design are identified and employed. Students will understand how to construct a wire sculpture, papier mch, modeling and molding, cultural sculptures and pots, art from nature sculptures, hand wiring sculptures, assemblages, crafts, recycled sculptures and paper sculptures. Students will work with dirty, messy, sticky and unpredictable materials. Students will learn craftsmanship like production and students will brainstorm multiple sketches. A series of projects are assigned which are completed during class and outside of class. Students will purchase their own art supplies. The students will participate in class critiques. Students will visit local galleries and or museums. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 111 PAINTING I



    Painting I is a studio course that will provide students with instruction in two-dimensional design . Students will utilize their previous experience in visual thinking and their technical approach to materials while building upon their knowledge of historical and contemporary design forms. Painting I will concentrate on channeling the student’s energies even as it instructs them on how to properly use painting media. Students will acquire various techniques while discovering their personal artistic vision .Students will acquire painting skills and brushstroke techniques using oil and acrylic paints as well as gouache and watercolors . Color and composition will be emphasized throughout this course.Students are required to purchase their own art supplies.Prerequisite: AR 100 Art Fundamentals and AR 131 Color 3 Credits Prerequisite: AR 100 Art Fundamentals and AR 131 Color
  
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    AR 121 DRAWING I



    This in-depth drawing studio introduces and builds upon fundamental drawing concepts that apply across disciplines. Line, value, shape, form, space, intent and other elements are included using direct observation. This comprehensive course reviews those basics of drawing using the portrait, still life, geometric shapes, landscape, interiors, and other disciplines. A series of problems designed to acquaint the students with perceptual and inventive skilled in drawing. Students will work with erasers, charcoals, pencils, pen and ink, black and white colored pencils, and conte crayons. Students will learn how to render shadows, highlights, perspective, space, depth, and gradation. Students will draw thumbnails, a midterm, a final composition and drawing ideas. Students will participate in critiques. Students will finish the course with a portfolio of drawings. Students are expected to purchase their own materials. Drawing I is a foundation course in drawing media and techniques; focusing on the study of objects and natural forms in problems of analysis and composition. This course is appropriate for experienced students and beginners. 3 Credits. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 122 DRAWING II



    This advanced drawing studio course focuses on the human form, city/landscape drawing, as well as abstract drawing skills. Students will be introduced to advanced drawing concepts, vocabulary, and concepts in art criticism. Students willengage in a variety of drawing techniques and mediums. Students may be required to purchase their own art supplies and will participate in weekly critiques. Pre?requisite: AR-121 3 Credits Prerequisite: AR 121
  
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    AR 131 COLOR



    This studio course will concentrate solely on color; easily the most powerful, yet neglected, aspect of an artist’s education. Through a practical exploration of theoretical and conceptual issues, students will become aware of the complex and interrelated nature of color in all of its perceptual, emotional, psychological, aesthetic, and technical aspects.Students will complete a series of studio color projects that emphasize color as an integral part of one’s work. They will acquire a broad and intuitive awareness of color as a formal means of visual communication and storytelling. The student’s complete understanding of color will include aesthetics and, most important, its creative and technical applications. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 200 WATERCOLORS



    This course will cover fundamental techniques of transparent watercolor media, such as wet on wet, dry brush, glazing, and knowledge of painting tools. Emphasis will be on value, light and applied color theory, vocabulary development, form, texture, space, and perspective. Students will create still life paintings, city/landscapes, and figurative painting. Students will acquire critical skills to evaluate paintings and participate in weekly critiques. Students may be required to purchase their own art supplies and exhibit their artwork. 3 Credits
  
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    AR 901 HIST APPRECIATION ART 1 INDEPEN STUDY



    History Appreciation of Art I - as independent study 3 Credits

Automotive: BMW

  
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    AB 100 AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS



    Examines the role and opportunities of the automotive technician in today’s society. Shop environment and personal safety are explored. Principles of operation of the internal combustion engine as applied to the automotive vehicles and components of cooling and lubrication systems, and charging/starting to provide practical experience in the identification, repair, and replacement of the components of these systems. Supplies the background information needed to understand the operation of the vehicles. Schematics and shop manuals are studied. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits
  
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    AB 102 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS



    Introduction to the fundamentals of electricity, magnetism, and basic electronics. A working knowledge of the electrical circuits which make up the automobile including the battery, starting, and charging systems. Emphasis will be placed on performing electrical tests, interpreting results, and the correct use of meters and test equipment. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab 3 credits. Total: 105 hours. 4 Credits
  
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    AB 103 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE DIAGNOSTIC AND REPAIRS



    A course designed to teach the principles and procedures necessary to repair an automotive engine and to provide the practical experience in engine diagnosis, removal, disassembly, rebuilding, and dynamic check out. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits Prerequisites: AB100, AB102
  
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    AB 105 HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING THEORY



    Designed to teach the fundamentals of the automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Special emphasis will be placed on the proper techniques for diagnosing air conditioning system problems as well as complete instruction in the recovering, recycling, evacuation and recharging equipment. Prerequisite: AB102 Lecture: 1 credit. Lab 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AB102
  
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    AB 106 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS



    Study of the principles, terminology, and theory of brake designs. Emphasis placed on brake inspection, parts replacement, locating and interpreting specifications, proper use of tools and machine equipment for both conventional and disc, diagnosing malfunctions.Prerequisites: AB100, AB102Lecture: 1 credit. Lab 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AB100, AB102
  
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    AB 121 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I



    This phase provides actual hands-on experience at a BMW dealership, covering one summer term. This co-op experience includes an employers work week for twelve or more weeks in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AB 103, AB 105, AB 106
  
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    AB 200 ADVANCED ENGINE PERFORMANCE



    Proper procedures of tune-up and diagnosis of the automobile internal combustion engine and fuel system. Emphasis is placed on isolating malfunctions on a particular system and following the correct procedure to locate the exact problem. The student learns how to make an intelligent hypothesis according to the way in which the vehicle operates. Emphasis is placed on correct use of equipment, interpreting test results using specifications, their location and units of measure. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab 3 credits. Total: 105 hours 5 Credits Prerequisites: AB 103, AB 121
  
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    AB 201 ELECTRONICS FUEL AND IGNITION SYSTEMS



    A study of the principles, terminology, and theory of electronic, fuel, and emission systems. Emphasis is placed on emission systems, part replacement, diagnosing malfunctions, locating and interpreting specifications, and proper use of test equipment. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AB 200
  
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    AB 202 MANUAL TRANSMISSION DRIVE SYS



    A course designed to teach the principals and operation of manual transmissions, drive axles, clutch discs, and pressure plates. The student will gain practical experience in the servicing and overhaul of manual transmissions and drive axles. 4 Credits
  
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    AB 203 AUTO TRANSMIS/AUTOMA



    Designed to teach the student the principles and operations of automatic transmissions, transaxles, overdrive units, and electronically controlled transmissions. This course will also provide practical experience in diagnosing and overhauling automatic transmissions and transaxles. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AB121
  
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    AB 204 AUTOMOTIVE SUSPENSION SYSTEMS



    A study of the principles and theory of suspension designs. Emphasis placed on part inspection and replacement, measuring and adjusting alignment angles, wheel balance, diagnosing procedures, and adjustment of steering and suspension units and components, using 2 and 4 wheel alignment techniques. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AB200, AB205
  
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    AB 205 AUTOMATIC/MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS, AND DRIVE SYSTEMS



    Designed to teach the student the principles and operations of automatic transmissions, transaxles, overdrive units, and electronically controlled transmissions, as well as, the principals and operation of manual transmissions, drive axles, clutch discs, and pressure plates. This course will also provide practical experience in diagnosing and overhauling automatic and manual transmissions and transaxles. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab 3 credits. Total: 105 hours. 6 Credits Prerequisite: AB 121
  
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    AB 208 ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS



    Designed to assist the student in mastering their troubleshooting skills. Covers basic principles of routine troubleshooting and diagnosis of electrical circuits, systems, and components. In addition the course covers complete usage of the Electrical Wiring Diagram and proper use of related diagnostic instruments.Prerequisites: AB102, AB200 Lecture: 1 credit. Lab 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AB 102, AB 200

Automotive: Chrysler

  
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    AY 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF AUTO TECHNOLOGY



    Introduces the student to the basic automotive competencies required to be productively employed in the first cooperative work session. The course content is designed to develop familiarity with basic service shop operations, including safety, and to develop a reasonable degree of skill in lube-oil-filter and new-car-prep assignments. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits PreReq for AY100
  
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    AY 109 DEALERSHIP ORIENTATION



    Provides actual hands-on work experience at a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles dealership. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 1 Credits Prerequisites: AY 100, AY 110.
  
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    AY 110 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICITY



    Introduces the student to the fundamentals of electricity, magnetism, and basic electronics. The course is designed to develop familiarity with basic concepts and theories and to develop a working knowledge of both the circuits that control the car and the component parts necessary for its operation. Emphasis is placed on locating and interpreting specifications, electrical testing, and the use of meters and test equipment. This course will include an introduction to starting and charging systems with an introduction to automotive electronics. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 105 hours. 4 Credits AY110 PreReq
  
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    AY 115 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I



    This phase provides actual hands-on experience at a Chrysler dealership, reinforcing tasks learned in the previous semester. This coop experience includes twelve weeks in supervised on-the-job training. 2 Credits Prerequisites: AY 100, AY 109, AY 110
  
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    AY 120 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS



    Prepares a student to diagnose and repair malfunctions using scan tool diagnostics. The student will be introduced to the electrical and electronic circuits and components in the current line of Chrysler-produced vehicles. Emphasis is placed on the inter-relationship of electronic circuitry and the need for a systematic, programmed approach to diagnosing electrical and electronic malfunctions. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AY115
  
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    AY 125 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION II



    This is the second co-op phase to reinforce spring semester courses. The co-op experience includes 8 weeks at a Chrysler dealership in supervised on-the-job training. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AY115, AY120, AY140, AY170
  
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    AY 140 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS



    Study of the principles, terminology, and theory of brake designs. Emphasis placed on brake inspection, parts replacement, locating and interpreting specifications, proper use of tools and machine equipment for both conventional and disc, diagnosing malfunctions. Lecture: 1 crediLab: 2 credit Total: 75 hour 3 Credits Prerequisite: AY115
  
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    AY 170 ELECTRONIC FUEL AND ENGINE CONTROLS



    Prepares a student to diagnose and repair malfunctions in the engine fuel and the electronic control systems. The course also covers fuel injection systems and basic emission controls. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 3 credit. Total: 105 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisite: AY110, AY115, AY120
  
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    AY 212 DIFFERENTIAL AND DRIVELINE REPAIR



    This course covers all phases of Differential and Driveline service, repair and diagnosis. Both front and rear axle assemblies and components are covered in this course. 2 Credits Prerequisite: AY 215
  
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    AY 215 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION III



    This is the third co-op phase to reinforce summer courses. The co-op experience includes 12 weeks at a Chrysler dealership in supervised on-the-job training. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AY 125, AY 221, AY 230
  
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    AY 221 HEATING, A/C & CLIMATE CONTROL SYSTEMS



    This course will prepare the student to diagnose and repair malfunctions and perform maintenance tasks on the heating, air conditioning and climate control systems. Students will be made aware of the licensing requirements concerning air conditioning repair and the laws governing CFC?s. Knowledge or R-134-A and R-12 systems and recovery and recycling procedures will be covered. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours 3 Credits Prerequisites: AY120, AY125
  
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    AY 225 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IV



    This is the final co-op experience before graduation. It provides hands on training at a Chrysler dealership that can include anything covered in the previous two years. This co-op experience includes twelve weeks in supervised on-the-job training. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AY215, AY245, AY253, AY270
  
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    AY 230 ENGINE PERFORMANCE



    This course will provide the students with a basic knowledge of the components and function of automotive emission control systems. Students will engage in the removal and replacement of components as well as component failure diagnosis, use of appropriate diagnostic equipment and an introduction to IM 240 regulations. 0 Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours 5 Credits Prerequisites: AY110, AY120, AY125, AY170
  
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    AY 245 ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR



    This course will introduce the student to the current line of Chrysler engine systems. Emphasis will be placed on component identification, construction and function. Each student will be directly involved in the tear down, inspection, measurement and re-assembly of an engine. Horsepower, torque, engine configurations and special tool use are also covered. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisite: AY215
  
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    AY 253 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS, MANUAL TRANSMISSION AND DRIVE SYSTEMS



    A course designed to teach the principles and operations of automatic and manual transmissions/transaxles. This course will provide practical experience in diagnosing, maintaining, and repairing automatic and manual transmissions/transaxles. Also included will be basic hydraulic principles and circuits, and electronically controlled transmissions. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AY 212, AY 215
  
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    AY 270 STEERING & SUSPENSION SYSTEMS



    This course will prepare the student to diagnose, repair and service the suspension and steering systems on current Chrysler products. Four wheel computerized alignment and alignment geometry will be included along with rack and pinion and re-circulating ball steering systems and a variety of chassis support systems. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AY215

Automotive: General Motors

  
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    AS 100 AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS



    A course to supply the background information needed to understand and perform minor services to the automobile. Topics include: auto shop equipment; wheels, hubs and tires; vehicle and part identification; battery service; ignition systems; fuel systems; and drive lines. This course also teaches shop safety, tool identification and use, basic engine design and construction, cooling systems, lubrication systems, and fundamentals of electrical systems.Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits
  
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    AS 102 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS



    Introduction to fundamentals of electricity, magnetism, and basic electronics. A working knowledge of circuits that make up the automobile and the component parts necessary for its operation. Emphasis placed on locating and interpreting specifications, electrical tests, and correct use of meters and test equipment. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 105 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisite: AS110
  
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    AS 105 HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING THEORY



    Principles and operation of heating and air-conditioning systems and accessories to provide practical experience in testing, analyzing, installing, and repairing. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AS110
  
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    AS 106 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS



    Principles, terminology, and theory of brake designs including ABS and TCS systems. Brake inspection, parts replacement, diagnosing malfunctions, locating and interpreting specifications, proper use of tools and service equipment for both drum and disc brakes. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AS100
  
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    AS 108 AUTOMOTIVE IGNITION AND FUEL SYSTEMS



    Prepares a student to diagnose and repair malfunctions in the engine fuel and the electronic control systems. The course also covers fuel injection systems and basic emission controls. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AS110
  
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    AS 110 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I



    Provides actual hands-on work experience at a General Motors dealership. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. ts 2 Credits Prerequisites: AS 100, AS 106, AS 113
  
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    AS 111 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION II



    Provides actual hands-on work experience at a General Motors dealership. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AS102, AS105, AS108, AS110
  
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    AS 113 DEALERSHIP ORIENTATION



    Provides actual hands-on work experience at a General Motors dealership. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-jobtraining at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 1 Credits Prerequisites: AS 100, AS 106
  
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    AS 204 AUTOMOTIVE SUSPENSION SYSTEMS



    A study of the principles and theory of suspension designs. Emphasis is placed on part inspection and replacement, measuring and adjusting alignment angles, wheel balance, diagnosing procedures, and adjustment of steering and suspension units and components, using 2 and 4 wheel alignment techniques. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. s 3 Credits Prerequisite: AS111
  
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    AS 206 ADVANCED ENGINE PERFORMANCE



    This course will provide the students with a basic knowledge of the components and function of automotive emission control systems. Students will engage in the removal and replacement of components as well as component failure diagnosis, use of appropriate diagnostic equipment and an introduction to IM 240 regulations. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits Prerequisite: AS111
  
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    AS 208 ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS



    Designed to assist the students in mastering their troubleshooting skills. Covers basic principles of routine troubleshooting and diagnosis of electrical circuits, systems, and components. In addition the course covers complete usage of the Electrical Wiring Diagram and proper use of related diagnostic instruments. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisite: AS209
  
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    AS 209 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION III



    Provides actual hands-on work experience at a General Motors dealership. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AS111, AS204, AS206
  
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    AS 210 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IV



    For second-year students, provides actual hands-on work experience at a General Motors dealership. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AS208, AS209, AS213, AS216
  
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    AS 213 AUTOMATIC/MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS & DRIVE SYSTEMS



    A course designed to teach the principles and operations of automatic and manual transmissions/transaxles and ALL wheel 4-wheel drive systems. This course will provide practical experience in diagnosing, maintaining, and repairing automatic and manual transmissions/transaxles. Also included will be basic hydraulic principles and circuits, and electronically controlled transmissions. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AS 209, AS 215
  
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    AS 215 INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS



    This course covers automatic transmission basics, fluids and checking, torque converter and TCC clutch operation, powerflow, and planetary gear sets. 2 Credits Prerequisite: AS 209
  
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    AS 216 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR



    A course designed to teach the principles and procedures necessary to repair an automotive engine and to provide the practical experience in engine diagnosis, removal, disassembly, rebuilding, and dynamic check out. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisite: AS209

Automotive: Toyota/Lexus

  
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    AT 101 INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE



    Examines the role and opportunities of the automotive service professional in today’s society. Shop environment, typical tools/equipment, and personal safety will be emphasized. Students will experience typical job-entry service skills and vehicle maintenance inspections. The necessary resources providing service information are examined. An Introduction of vehicle operation and support systems will be presented. This course provides the background information required to continue this program. Students may also earn University of Toyota / Lexus College credit. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AT101, AT102
  
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    AT 102 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS



    Introduction to the fundamentals of electricity, magnetism, and basic electronics. A working knowledge of the electrical circuits which make up the automobile including the battery, starting, and charging systems. Emphasis will be placed on performing electrical tests, interpreting results, and the correct use of meters and test equipment. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits
  
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    AT 103 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE DIAGNOSTIC AND REPAIRS



    A course designed to teach the principles and procedures necessary to repair an automotive engine and to provide the practical experience in engine diagnosis, removal, disassembly, rebuilding, and dynamic check out. 5 Credits Prerequisites: AT100, AT102
  
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    AT 105 HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING THEORY



    Designed to teach the fundamentals of the automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Special emphasis will be placed on the proper techniques for diagnosing air conditioning system problems as well complete instruction in the recovering, recycling, evacuation and recharging equipment. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT100, AT102
  
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    AT 106 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS



    Study of the principles, terminology, and theory of brake designs. Emphasis placed on brake inspection, parts replacement, locating and interpreting specifications, proper use of tools and machine equipment for both conventional and disc, diagnosing malfunctions. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT100, AT102
  
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    AT 109 TOYOTA TECHNICIAN PORTFOLIO TPORT



    To improve student success in a Cooperative education program the Toyota Portfolio requirement was developed. The portfolio guides the student through the entire Co-Op process, including finding a sponsor dealer, understanding dealer expectations, maintaining a work journal and evaluations of their work experience. It is the student responsibility to maintain the portfolio and complete the assignments on time and obtain all necessary signatures. Completion of the portfolio is mandatory to complete the T-TEN Program. Total: 15 hours. 1 Credits
  
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    AT 113 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR



    A course designed to teach the principles and procedures necessary to understand the operation and repair of an automotive engine and provide a practical experience in engine diagnosis, disassembly, inspection and reassembly of a new model engine. Performing precision measurements and interpreting service specifications will be emphasized. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AT101, AT102
  
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    AT 114 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS



    Study of the principles, terminology, and theory of brake systems designs. Emphasis placed on brake inspection, parts replacement, locating and interpreting specifications. Proper use of tools and machine equipment for both drums and disc types will be experienced. Diagnosing system malfunctions is examined and students are introduced to Anti-Lock Brake Systems, Traction Control, Electronic Brake Distribution Vehicle Stability Control and other newer technologies. Students may also earn University of Toyota/ Lexus College credit. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 90 hours. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AT101, AT102
  
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    AT 116 SUSPENSION, STEERING, AND HANDLING



    A study of the principles and theory of suspension designs. Emphasis placed on part inspection and replacement, measuring and adjusting alignment angles, wheel balance, diagnosing procedures, and adjustment of steering and suspension units and components, using 2 and 4 wheel alignment techniques. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 60 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT101, AT102
  
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    AT 120 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I



    This is a summer semester course, which provides hands-on job entry experience at a Toyota dealership. This co-op provides a fulltime employee?s work schedule for 13 weeks or more. This ?real world? work experience is supervised and graded. Co-op I is a mandatory requirement to return for the 2nd year of the T-TEN program. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT109, AT113, AT114, AT116
  
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    AT 200 ADVANCED ENGINE PERFORMANCE



    Proper procedures of tune-up and diagnosis of the automobile internal combustion engine and fuel system. Emphasis is placed on isolating malfunctions on a particular system and following the correct procedure to locate the exact problem. The student learns how to make an intelligent hypothesis according to the way in which the vehicle operates. Emphasis is placed on correct use of equipment, interpreting test results using specifications, their location and units of measure. 5 Credits Prerequisite: AT121
  
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    AT 201 ELECTRONICS FUEL AND IGNITION SYSTEMS



    A study of the principles, terminology, and theory of electronic, fuel, and emission systems. Emphasis is placed on emission systems, part replacement, diagnosing malfunctions, locating and interpreting specifications, and proper use of test equipment. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AT200, AT205
  
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    AT 204 AUTOMOTIVE SUSPENSION SYSTEMS



    A study of the principles and theory of suspension designs. Emphasis placed on part inspection and replacement, measuring and adjusting alignment angles, wheel balance, diagnosing procedures, and adjustment of steering and suspension units and components, using 2 and 4 wheel alignment techniques. 4 Credits Prerequisites: AT200, AT205
  
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    AT 205 AUTOMOTIC TRANSMISSION, AND DRIVE SYSTEMS



    This is a two-part course covering automatic, manual transmissions and vehicle driveline systems. Part 1: is a study of the construction and operation of automatic transmissions and transaxles. Emphasis will be on the diagnostic techniques of electrical, hydraulic, and mechanical systems. Part 2: covers the components and operation of manual transmission/transaxles, clutches, differentials, drive shafts, and four-wheel drive systems. The disassembly and reassembly of selected transmissions and on vehicle activities will strengthen the students understanding of proper inspections, measurements and testing procedures required to perform successful service. Lecture: 3 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 13 hour 6 Credits Prerequisite: AT120
  
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    AT 207 ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEMS I



    This course is designed to increase the Technician?s understanding and diagnostic skills related to engine control systems. Major areas to be covered are the identification, operation, function, and basic diagnosis of the following: Electronic Control Module (ECM): fuel injection systems: engine control system sensors and actuators: ignition systems: idle speed control systems, and EGR systems. Emphasis will be on solving drivability concerns using all available resources, i.e. manuals, DVOM, oscilloscope, diagnostic testers, and related special tools. Students may also earn University of Toyota/Lexus College credit. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits Prerequisites: AT102, AT120
  
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    AT 208 BODY ELECTRICAL DIAGNOSIS



    Designed to assist the student in mastering their troubleshooting skills. Covers basic principles of routine troubleshooting and diagnosis of electrical circuits, systems, and components. In addition the course covers usage of the Toyota Electrical Wiring Diagrams and proper use of related diagnostic instruments. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT 102, AT 120, AT 205, AT 207, AT 213
  
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    AT 209 ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEMS II



    Covers the use of the Toyota Techstream Tester and OBD II engine control. Schematic diagnostic approaches to Toyota engine control systems including use of on-board vehicle data will be emphasized. Students may also earn University of Toyota/Lexus College credit. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT102, AT207
  
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    AT 212 AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING & CLIMATE CONTROL



    To cover basic (and advanced) concepts of mobile heating, air conditioning and climate control systems. Students will demonstrate their understanding of environmental issues prior to hands-on activities on the recovery, recycling, and evacuation and recharging of automotive refrigerants. Special emphasis will be placed on students learning the fundamentals of system operation, troubleshooting techniques and repair procedures on new model vehicles. Students may also earn University of Toyota/Lexus College credit. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT102, AT208
  
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    AT 213 HYBRID VEHICLE GENERAL SERVICE



    This course will introduce students to hybrid vehicle technology. Vehicle features, operating modes, and major hybrid components will be discussed. Safety issues and vehicle operation will be emphasized. Hybrid vehicle maintenance and general service procedures will be experienced. Students may also earn University of Toyota/Lexus College credit. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours 1 Credits Prerequisite: AT102, AT120
  
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    AT 220 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION II



    To provide a 2nd ?real world? experience at a Toyota or Lexus dealership. This full time work experience is for a minimum of 7-weeks prior to program completion. Emphasis is placed on the completion of a productivity worksheet and co-op completion surveys prior to final evaluation. This co-op is also graded and is mandatory to complete the Toyota T-TEN program. 3 Credits Prerequisites: AT120, AT208, AT209, AT212

Automotive: TSEP

  
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    AI 100 AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS



    Examines the role and opportunities of the automotive service professional in today’s society. Shop environment, typical tools/equipment, and personal safety will be emphasized. Students will experience typical job-entry service skills and vehicle maintenance inspections. The necessary resources providingservice information are examined. An Introduction of vehicle operation and support systems will be presented. This course provides the background information and is a prerequisite for all of the other courses. Total:3 hours 1 Credits
  
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    AI 102 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS



    Introduction to the fundamentals of electricity, magnetism, and basic electronics. A working knowledge of the electrical circuits which make up the automobile including the battery, starting, and charging systems. Emphasis will be placed on performing electrical tests, interpreting results, and the correct use of meters and test equipment. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits
  
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    AI 103 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR



    A course designed to teach the principles and procedures necessary to understand the operation andrepair of an automotive engine and provide a practical experience in the diagnosis, disassembly, inspection and reassembly of a new model engine. Performing precision measurements and interpreting service specifications will be emphasized. Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits
  
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    AI 105 HEATING/AIR CONDITIONING THEORY



    To cover basic and advanced concepts of mobile heating, air conditioning and climate control systems. Students will demonstrate their understanding of environmental issues prior to hands-on activities on therecovery, recycling, and evacuation and recharging of automotive refrigerants. Special emphasis will be placed on students learning the fundamentals of system operation, troubleshooting techniques and repair procedures on new model vehicles.Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits
  
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    AI 106 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS



    A study of the principles, terminology and theory of brake system designs. Emphasis placed on brake inspection, parts replacement, locating and interpreting specifications. Proper use of tools and machine equipment for both drums and disc types will be experienced. Diagnosing system malfunctions is examined and students are introduced to Anti-Lock Brake Systems, Traction Control, Electronic Brake Distribution and other newer technologies. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits
  
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    AI 121 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I



    Provides actual hands-on work experience. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 160 hours each. Total: 480 hours. 2 credits 2 Credits
  
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    AI 122 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION II



    Provides actual hands-on work experience. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 160 hours each. Total: 480 hours. 2 Credits
  
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    AI 123 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION III



    Provides actual hands-on work experience. Co-op experience includes an employer’s work week in supervised on-the-job training at the dealership. Full-time work experience. 160 hours each. Total: 480 hours. 2 Credits
  
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    AI 200 ENGINE PERFORMANCE



    This course is designed to increase the Technician’s understanding and diagnostic skills related to engine control systems. Major areas to be covered are the identification, operation, function, and basic diagnosis of the following: Electronic Control Module (ECM): fuel injection systems: engine control system sensors andactuators: ignition systems: idle speed control systems, and EGR systems. Emphasis will be on solving drivability concerns using all available resources, i.e. manuals, DVOM, oscilloscope, diagnostic testers, and related special tools.Lecture: 2 credits. Lab: 3 credits. Total: 120 hours. 5 Credits
  
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    AI 202 MANUAL TRANSMISSION & DRIVE LINES



    This course covers the components and operation of manual transmission, transaxles, clutches, differentials, drive shafts, and four-wheel drive systems. Emphasis will be on the diagnostic techniques. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits
  
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    AI 203 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS



    This course will study the construction and operation of automatic transmissions and transaxles. Emphasis will be on the diagnostic techniques of electrical, hydraulic, and mechanical systems. Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits
  
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    AI 204 AUTOMOTIVE SUSPENSION SYSTEMS



    Fundamentals principles and the operation of tires and wheels, suspension components, steeringgear, linkage, and power assist systems are examined. Inspection and diagnostic methods are also reviewed for each major component area. The course incorporates a thorough review of wheel alignment geometry and wheel alignment correction and provides a diagnostic method for vehicle handling concerns.Lecture: 1 credit. Lab: 2 credits. Total: 75 hours. 3 Credits

Biology

  
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    BI 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I w/LAB



    Biological principles common to all organisms are examined. An in depth study of the cell is presented including the chemistry, structure and function of cell organelles, metabolism, photosynthesis, cell reproduction, Mendelian genetics, and patterns of inheritance, chromosomal inheritance, molecular genetics, DNA technology and protein synthesis. Lecture: 3 hours per week. Lab: 2 hours per week 4 Credits
  
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    BI 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II w/LAB



    For non-science majors, a study is made of the mechanisms of evolution. The origin and diversity of life is studied by examining the evolutionary development of organisms in the three domains - Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. Animal structure and function is covered by studying the principles and evolution of each organ system and then focusing on the human. This is followed by a study of plant structure andfunction. The course ends with a study of the ecological interrelationships among organisms and organisms with their environment. Lecture: 3 hours per week. Lab: 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: BI 101 4 Credits Prerequisite: BI101
  
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    BI 105 DNA METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY



    This course primarily examines the science and statistics behind the use of DNA databases for human identification. Topics include mammalian DNA quantification; nucleotide sequencing; polymerase chain reaction; population genetics and allelic and genotypic frequencies; and calculations of exclusion probabilities for matches at multiple loci in genetic subpopulations. Lecture: 3 hours per week. 3 credits.Prerequisites: BI 101, or equivalent, or consent of instructor; MA 105. 3 Credits Prerequisites: BI 101, or equivalent, or consent of instructor; MA 105.
  
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    BI 106 DNA METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY LABORATORY



    This course examines the technologies behind the use of DNA databases for human identification. Laboratory exercises include DNA qualifications; DNA electrophoresis; and nucleotide sequence analysis. Lecture + Laboratory: 6 hours per week. 3 credits 3 Credits
 

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